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Quiz show

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Alternative Title: game show

Quiz show, also called game show, broadcast show designed to test the memory, knowledge, agility, or luck of persons selected from a studio or broadcast audience or to contrive a competition among these people for merchandise or cash awards. The quiz show first gained popularity on U.S. radio in the 1930s as an audience-participation program. One of its first successes featured a formidable Doctor I.Q. who hurled questions at individuals in a studio audience and rewarded them for correct answers with silver dollars. A later development was the quiz show style of Information, Please, which involved a panel answering questions on diverse subjects mailed in by listeners. This show was such a success that it had several imitators, the most popular of which was The Quiz Kids, which used precocious children on the studio panel.

Berle, Milton
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American television adopted the quiz show in the early 1950s and further increased its popularity. In place of the merchandise awards that outstanding radio contestants received, television used large cash awards. An indication of the quantum increase was the escalation from one radio program’s highest prize, $64 on Take It or Leave It, to the spectacular top prize of The $64,000 Question on television. The era of television’s big-money quiz shows began in 1955.

Attempting to manipulate the outcome of the show so that dull and uninteresting contestants lost and the amiable underdog (or the contestant favoured most by the audience) won, quiz show producers began secretly briefing the contestants chosen to win and thereby increased the shows’ popularity. In 1958 a defeated contestant accused the producers of Twenty-One of unfair practices. The accusation led to investigations by a New York grand jury and by a congressional subcommittee on legislative oversight, which proved the charges to be true. The scandal led to a quick demise of the big-money shows. In the mid-1960s the television networks revived the quiz show in game formats with lower stakes, and by the 1980s they were again extremely popular. Such quiz shows included Jeopardy! (1984– ), Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (1999–2020), and Are You Smarter Than a 5th Grader? (2007–10, 2015, 2019– ).

河南取消2655户保障性住房对象资格 This article was most recently revised and updated by Patricia Bauer, Assistant Editor.
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